Raccoon Cafe: A Must-Do in Seoul!

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One relaxed raccoon
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Raccoon closeup

Raccoons. Garbage bears. Trash pandas. Whatever you call them, raccoons are, undeniably, both a cute animal and one that many of us only associate with burrowing through trash bins at night, and rabies. (All of us, except for my ex-coworker, Michael F, who grew up with not one, but two pet raccoons!) Alex (who loves documentaries) and I (who love furry animals) finally found a genre we could both enjoy on Netflix: animal documentaries. A few months ago, we watched “Raccoon Nation,” a PBS documentary on raccoons. I highly recommend this series. You’ll learn that raccoons are incredibly smart and resourceful animals!

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Anna being hugged by a raccoon

Well, leave it up to Seoul, home to many themed-cafes (including, but not limited to, a poop cafe, cat and dog cafes, and even a sheep cafe), to have raccoon cafes (yes, plural, because in doing my research on raccoon cafes, I easily found three, and I’m sure there are more!). So, if you’re anything like me (i.e. if you love soft and fluffy animals), it’s a no-brainer to go to one of these raccoon cafes!

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Please give me food!

After we put the kiddies to bed, my friend Anna and I headed to Hongdae, the lively, university-town area of Seoul, home to several of the aforementioned themed-cafes. After walking in the rain (with no umbrellas) for 15 minutes (only to discover that the address I found on a blog was outdated), we walked back towards the Hongdae subway stop, to the new location.

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This raccoon is actually on the OTHER side of the door — he somehow “escaped”
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Do you have treats?!

When we arrived, we were instructed to take off our shoes (and put on slippers that were provided) and leave our shoes and all belongings (except for phone/camera/wallet) in a locker. The admission fee is 6,000 KRW (~$6 USD), and buying a drink is optional. (The drinks were really reasonably priced – from 1,000 to 3,000 KRW – my latte was 2,000.) We were advised to guard our drinks closely (or put them up on a high shelf that was “raccoon-proof”), as the raccoons liked to spill and steal drinks/straws (Anna was drinking her lemonade and a raccoon scurried onto the table and grabbed at her drink!).  We walked through two sets of “gates,” and there we were, in a large room with a dozen people, two dogs (a Corgi and a bulldog), and seven raccoons!

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Raccoon selfie

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OMG, I’m holding a raccoon!

Anna and I were immediately greeted by a very friendly, and rather large, raccoon, who proceeded to climb up my leg. I’m not going to lie, I did panic a little. There I was, with a raccoon to my chest, unsure of the proper way to hold a raccoon… It felt like holding a very large cat, with a super fluffy tail, but one that you are kind of afraid to snuggle. But, I (probably) shouldn’t have worried. The raccoons at the cafe were all fairly friendly. One girl had a blonde raccoon (lighter colored fur than a “traditional” raccoon) sleeping on her lap!

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Raccoon trying to steal a drink

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Raccoon having a drink

Some highlights:

– Anna bought some raccoon treats (4,000 KRW) — this resulted in several raccoons scurrying over and begging for treats! They will stand on their hind legs to get treats!

– There was a plastic slide and one raccoon in particular enjoyed sliding down.

– Petting the raccoons. Their fur is really thick, slightly coarse, but very fluffy. From my (too brief) experiences petting a panda and a tiger, I think a raccoon’s fur is definitely softer.

– Watching the raccoons drink water from a water bottle feeder (like what are in gerbil/hamster cages).

– Laughing at Anna as she somehow ended up with two of the blonde raccoons on her back. It was hilarious to watch… mostly because she didn’t know what to do with them!

– Touching the pads of a sleeping raccoon’s paw. They are so soft!

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Raccoon, standing like a meerkat

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Feeding a raccoon a treat

It was such a unique experience, actually petting raccoons! They are such cute and smart animals! (The ones in the cafe were “potty trained” — they knew to use the pee/poop pads in the corners of the room to do their business!)

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Give me treats!

I definitely want to go again. And, after showing Alex my pictures, he also wants to go! So, who knows, maybe Alex and I will have a raccoon cafe date night. 😯

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Holding a blonde raccoon

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Anna somehow had two blonde raccoons climb onto her back…

 { Raccoon Cafe in Hongdae 홍대 라쿤카페 맹쿤} 

Address: 서울 마포구 홍익로 17 / 서교동 358-2 4층
Location: On the 4th floor of the ABC Mart building
Closest subway stop: Hongdae Univ. (line 2), exit 9
Admission: 6,000 KRW
Drinks: 1,000 – 3,000 KRW, optional
Minimum age of admission: 12 years old
Hours: 12:30 PM – 10:30 PM (note that they start herding the raccoons into their cages around 10:15 PM)

Note that the address/map listed on the Facebook page (not their official page) isn’t correct.

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Raccoon playground
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Going down a slide

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To read about my experience at a kids cafe in Seoul: Lilliput Cafe: Fun, New Kids Cafe

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8 responses to “Raccoon Cafe: A Must-Do in Seoul!”

  1. Tina says :

    Hiya just wanted to ask is this the same as The Blind Alley cafe? I read reviews for that one and a majority of the people wrote how there were ruled about how you couldn’t touch the raccoons 😦 and I was looking to interact with them so I just wanted to be sure~♡

    • OliviaM says :

      Hi Tina,

      Thanks for stopping by my blog. 🙂

      No, this is NOT the same place as Blind Alley. I’ve been to both places, and I definitely prefer this place (홍대 라쿤카페 맹쿤) over Blind Alley. Blind Alley does have rules about interaction AND they only have a few (three, I think) raccoons. 홍대 라쿤카페 맹쿤 has many raccoons, and you ARE allowed to pick them up and play with them.

      If you want to read my review of Blind Alley, read here:

      Let me know if you have more questions!

      Olivia

      • Tina says :

        Thank you so much for responding! I’d like to know what’s the English name for this cafe you went to? Can’t seem to find it on Google maps and the only place it offered me was the Blind Alley unfortunately. So I thought at first it was THE only raccoon cafe in korea 😦

        Ps. I read your blogs frequently they’re always so enjoyable to read!💜

      • OliviaM says :

        Hi Tina,

        I couldn’t find the English name either. I suggest you copy and paste the Korean into google maps. It’ll pop up. Also, I’ve listed the directions and hours on my blog post, but here it is again:

        { Raccoon Cafe in Hongdae 홍대 라쿤카페 맹쿤}
        Address: 서울 마포구 홍익로 17 / 서교동 358-2 4층
        Location: On the 4th floor of the ABC Mart building
        Closest subway stop: Hongdae Univ. (line 2), exit 9
        Admission: 6,000 KRW
        Drinks: 1,000 – 3,000 KRW, optional
        Minimum age of admission: 12 years old
        Hours: 12:30 PM – 10:30 PM (note that they start herding the raccoons into their cages around 10:15 PM)

        Note that the address/map listed on the Facebook page (not their official page) isn’t correct.

        Olivia

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